New Reflections from Malcolm Gibson

RUNNER’S NEW YEARS

I have been a marathoner half my life. For the past three decades I’ve welcomed each New Year’s morning with a long run. Only runners would view this as a positive thing. It does, however, give me pause to reflect on the past year and what the next one may hold in store. As I was considering how the scars from 2016 may have blighted our prospects for a profitable 2017, it dawned on me how wrongheaded my thinking was. In runners’ parlance, the New Year is not a series of sprints to be won or lost. Rather, it is…

PLAIN TALK COLUMN RESONATES

Reader response to the “Plain Talk Can Bring Us Together” column has been brisk. For those of you who are willing to take the challenge of Plain Talk, I encourage you to forward the article to someone of another ethnicity with whom you would like to discuss your thoughts. If you wish, you may forward to me the results of your conversation or post them on my Facebook page at Mack Gibson-Writer. I will also edit for length all responses and post them here (anonymously if you prefer).

LA LANGUE INTERNATIONALE N’EXPOSE PAS LA VÉRITÉ

Les Européens qui se préoccupent de la dette de l’euro me rappellent comment leur rivalité aurait pu évoquer un désastre d’un genre différent. Il s’est passé un jour au Butlin’s Holiday Camp à Bognor Regis sur la côte sud de l’Angleterre. Je travaillais un emploi d’été dans le parc d’attraction. J’ai couru l’inclinaison-à-tourbillon. À côté de moi, une grande roue de quatre étages était grande. Du haut de la roue géante, un jour clair, vous pouvez voir à travers la Manche à Calais. Nous avons eu beaucoup de touristes français. Les Français et les Anglais ne s’entendent pas. Les premiers…

REMEMBERING ANDY ROONEY: THANKS, PAL

THANKS, PAL By: Andy Rooney Ernie Pyle, who wrote the book Brave Men, was the best kind of brave man I ever knew. He didn’t have the thoughtless, macho kind of bravado that is sometimes mistaken for bravery. He was a war correspondent who was afraid of being killed but did what he had to do in spite of it. Mostly, Ernie stayed right with the infantrymen who were doing the fighting and the dying. On the scrubby little island of Ie Shima, Ernie was moving up with the infantry when he was shot dead by a Japanese machine gunner…